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A pangrammatic anagrammatic verse composed by Edwin Fitzpatrick — each line contains each of the 20 consonants once and each of the six vowels twice:

Why jog exquisite bulk, fond crazy vamp,
Daft buxom jonquil, zephyr's gawky vice?
Guy fed by work, quiz Jove's xanthic lamp –
Zow! Qualms by deja vu gyp fox-kin thrice.

And it rhymes!

Found on http://www.futilitycloset.com/2008/06/20/roll-call/

Date: 2008-09-17 04:41 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] lizziesilver.livejournal.com
...

The moral of the story: poetry by numbers sucks.

Date: 2008-09-17 05:20 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] actrealdon.livejournal.com
Bah. Poetry is in the ear of the beholder.

Personally
I don't like
poetry that seems
to be just
a sentence broken
into more lines than
necessary.

Date: 2008-09-17 05:35 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] lizziesilver.livejournal.com
That stuff's easy to write (though it's icky).
But most serious poetry's tricky.
I like just one gimmick:
The good ol' limerick
This probably means I'm too picky.

Date: 2008-09-17 06:32 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] actrealdon.livejournal.com
I like my poems with rhythmic metre;
Which leads me to things like pentameter
Designed for Latin, words don't always fit
in English, but still I like to work with it

Date: 2008-09-17 06:47 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] lizziesilver.livejournal.com
Ahaha, that scans even worse than mine. I think it reads marginally better as quadrameter. :P

Date: 2008-09-17 06:57 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] actrealdon.livejournal.com
I accidentally left "still" in the final line and "pentameter" doesn't like to fit in its own metre at all.

I would make the point that making things scan in limericks is a lot easier than in iambic metres.

How would you rewrite it in quadrameter?

Date: 2008-09-17 07:26 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] lizziesilver.livejournal.com
I didn't suggest rewriting it, but it can be read several ways. You can choose where to place the emphases:

"I like my po'ms with rhythmic metre" (four strong beats, so quadrameter)
sounds more natural to me than
"I like my poems with rhythmic metre" (trochaic pentameter) or
"I like my poems with rhythmic metre" (iambic pentameter).

I don't know if I could rewrite your verse in iambic quadrameter, but I can write you a new one:

My poem's steady, rhythmic beat
Consists of only four strong feet.
Though fitting words is no mean feat,
The finished product sounds quite sweet. :)

Limericks are slightly more flexible, because you can start each line with one or two weak beats and still get away with it. But they're tricky in their own way. If you think limericks are so easy, try rewriting your verse as one! :P

Date: 2008-09-17 04:58 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] jokermage.livejournal.com
What does it mean?

Date: 2008-09-17 05:17 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] actrealdon.livejournal.com
It seems as though it would require a lot of context to explain/justify - context I do not have, but could make up if you wish.

Date: 2008-09-17 05:32 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] apex-chio.livejournal.com
*brain explodes*

That is...guh...

*shelters in the safety of John Donne's work* Ask Jess about the poem I read her in the car.

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